S R P G A
Awards and History
 


 
Golfer of the Year
Explanation
Harrison Williams Award

2017: Harley Cook
2016: Will Howard
2015: Will Howard
2014: Will Howard
2013: Will Howard
2012: Will Howard
2011: Curt Freeman

2010:
2009: George Alvarado
2008: Troy Mock
2007: Kevin Goerlich
2006: Felix Dominguez
2005: Felix Dominguez

Annual Low Gross
Explanation

2017: Tim Camper, Jr.
2016: Jeff Butler, 78.2
2015: Will Howard
2014: Will Howard
2013: Tim Camper, Jr.
2012: Will Howard, 79
2011: Mark Davis, 80
2010: 
2009: Paul Thompson
2008: Troy Mock
2007: Bob Larchick
2006: Ray Upshaw
2005: Mark Davis
Most Improved Golfer
Explanation
Cliff Cameron Award

2017: Tim Camper, Jr.
2016: Richard Dart
          (25.1 to 19.3)
2015: Bill Valliere
2014: Ron Hurd (8.7 to 5.4)
2013: Mark Davis
2012: Curt Freeman
2011: John Joiner

2010:
2009: Terry Miller
2008: Troy Mock
2007: Kevin Goerlich
2006: Ray Upshaw
2005: Todd Wagley

  Comments  
 

 
Steve Webber
Dobson Ranch (low net)
About Steve

2018: Dennis Roach, net 59
2017: Gibs Saint Paul, net 62
2016: Tim Camper, Sr., net 63
2015: Will Howard, net 63
2014: Gary Becher, net 65
2013: Mark Davis, net 64
2012: Mike McGandy, net 65
2011: Troy Gates, net 62

Greg Witherspoon  
Antelope Hills (low net)
About Greg

2017: Robert Campos, net 66

2016: Joe Pacheco, net 61
2015: Dick Goerlich, net 65
2014: Tony Mejia, net 62
2013: Jim Spence, net 62

2012: Curt Freeman, net 64
2011: Victor Hanks, net 67
Tom Copeland
Ken McDonald (low net)
About Tom

2018: George Hayes, net 61
2017: Richard Castaneda, net 51
     
Golfer of the Year

Harrison Williams Award

This annual award recognizes participation and sustained competitiveness. The more tournaments you play in, and the more often you finish at the top of your flight, the better your chances.

A point system determines the Golfer of the Year.

  • Net scores determine points.

  • The number of golfers in a tournament determines the points that can be won by the golfer who has the lowest net score [in each flight?]. For a first-place tie in a flight, scorecards are compared. Other ties get the same points.

  • One point is awarded to players who tee off but do not post an 18-hole score.

  • Skill prizes are worth 5 points.

Harrison Williams

Harrison, the Superintendent of Building Services, was the driving force behind the formation of what we all now enjoy as the Salt River Project Golf Association (SRPGA).

In the early 1960s, Harrison sought a means to get to know other management people throughout SRP in an informal way to facilitate networking, and since he was an avid golfer, he invited some other management people to join him on a golf outing. Everything went so well, they determined that this type of outing might be good for all employees to enjoy and a way to get to know people in other departments.

And thus, the Project Golf Association was charted through the PERA Club. 
 
Harrison was with the Project from 1949 until his death in 1973.
 

     

Annual Low Gross

This annual award recognizes the player who has the lowest gross score average.

Eligibility

To be eligible for the award, a player must meet the following requirements:

  1. A player must compete in at least 10 of the sanctioned SRPGA tournament rounds available. Note that the Western States tournament is not an SRPGA tournament and does not count toward the number played. Neither does a scramble event. Any tournaments after the annual banquet count towards next year’s total.
     
  2. Once a player begins play in a sanctioned SRPGA tournament, if that player X’s out on any hole, is disqualified by the Rules Committee, or for any reason fails to post a score in that tournament, their round will not be counted in qualifying for this award.
     
  3. If a player signs up for a tournament, but is excluded by the lottery system (Policy 5), then the player still counts the tournament as if they played in it.

 

     

Most Improved Golfer Award

Cliff Cameron Award

This annual award recognizes the player who makes the most improvement over the year, and we use the USGA method to make that determination (see also the eligibility requirements):

1.   Add 12* to the player's Handicap Index at the start of the season. This is value A.
 

2.   Add 12 to the player's Handicap Index at the end of the season. This is value B.
 

3.   Divide value A by value B, calculating to three decimal places. This is the improvement factor.
 

4.   The player with the highest improvement factor should receive the most improved player award.

*The number 12 has been determined by the USGA as equitable in gauging the improvement of players encompassing the entire spectrum of handicaps. For example, it is relatively the same improvement factor to go from a 20.0 to a 10.0 Handicap Index (improvement factor of 1.454) as it is to go from a 5.0 to a scratch, or zero Handicap Index (improvement factor of 1.416), yet the change in Handicap Index is "10" (20 - 10) versus "5" (5 - 0) strokes. The number 12 takes into consideration the level of a player's improvement rather than the net change in Handicap Index.

Eligibility

To be eligible for this award, a player must meet the following requirements:

  1. A player must compete in at least 10 of the sanctioned SRPGA tournament rounds available. Note that the Western States tournament is not an SRPGA tournament and does not count toward the number played. Neither does a scramble event. Any tournaments after the annual banquet count towards next year’s total.
      
  2. Once a player begins play in a sanctioned SRPGA tournament, if that player X’s out on any hole, is disqualified by the Rules Committee, or for any reason fails to post a score in that tournament, their round will not be counted in qualifying for this award.
     
  3. If a player signs up for a tournament, but is excluded by the lottery system (Policy 5), then the player still counts the tournament as if they played in it.

Cliff Cameron

For over 30 years, Cliff Cameron worked as an SRP employee, mostly in Meter Reading Operations, retiring as a supervisor. Cliff ardently participated and supported the SRP Golf Association throughout the 1960s, ’70s, and ’80s. He served on the Association’s Board of Directors for over ten years, running many tournaments completely by himself. Armed with a keen sense of humor, Cliff was renowned for running “spectacular” golf tournaments, as he liked to call them.

Cliff waged a valiant ten-year battle with leukemia, missing very few workdays and even fewer golf association tournaments. He maintained an excellent attitude throughout this time, and vowed to stay “one-up” on the biggest challenge of his life. Unfortunately, this was one battle that he was not able to win. Cliff left us all on November 1, 1989. He was one great man, and left behind a lot of friends and a beautiful family.

To honor Cliff’s many-year contributions to the SRPGA, the Board posthumously established the “Most Improved Golfer” award in Cliff’s name. Each year, the SRPGA recognizes one golfer for making the greatest reduction in his or her handicap. Cliff would have been proud to be honored in this manner.
 

     
Steve Webber

Passionate about golf, Steve loved everything about game. He learned to make his own clubs and would build clubs for his friends. As a 15-year member of the SRPGA board of directors, Steve served as Rules Chairman for about eight of those years. He loved the Dobson Ranch Golf Course and served as tournament director for the Dobson tournament for many years. Prior to his passing at age 54 he worked at SRP from 1969–2002 as a lineman and later as a line inspector who reported needed repairs and maintenance on SRP power lines.
 

     

Greg Witherspoon

As an all-around athlete who believed in fitness, Greg excelled in extreme skiing, enjoyed running, and loved the game of golf. He attended Arizona State University on scholarship and played on the baseball team. Greg worked at SRP from 1979–2001 in the Environmental Sciences Department. He also served on the SRPGA Board and his favorite tournament was Antelope Hills in Prescott, AZ, where he served as its director for many years. He was also a spiritual person who volunteered time to service of others including the refugees from Sudan.
 

 

Tom Copeland

TBD
 

     

 

 

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Tom Barnett
Last updated: March 27, 2018.